AED

Student Athlete Risk for SCA

PLUS_EV_sch_soccer_2_HRIs your team prepared?

Coaches spend countless hours preparing student athletes for competition, but how about training them to save a life? Studies show between 6,000 - 8,000 teens experience sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) annually;of those affected, only 1 in 10 will survive.2

Student athletes are at heightened risk for SCA due to the additional strain placed on the heart during athletic conditioning and competition. Contributing factors include the influx of adrenaline, dehydration, fever, and changes in electrolytes.3

An SCA victim’s best chance of survival depends on having an automated external defibrillator (AED) close at hand. Nine out of ten victims who receive a shock from an AED within the first minute’s survive.Ensuring that your students and coaches are trained to respond to an SCA emergency could help save a life.

SCA can strike without warning, but sometimes symptoms are presented.

Train your student athletes to know the warning signs:5

  • Fainting

  • Chest pain

  • Shortness of breath

  • Irregular heartbeat – racing or fluttering

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness

  • Extreme fatigue


Watch this video to learn the story of a high school volleyball player whose life was saved when volunteers took action.

Having AEDs readily accessible throughout your school’s campus will help ensure that you are prepared to respond to an SCA emergency, whether it happens on the field, in the gym, or in the cafeteria.

 To learn more about how the ZOLL AED Plus can help prepare your school for an SCA emergency click here.

Sources:

1“Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Teenage Athletes: What’s the Risk?”. Promise powered by Nemours Children’s Health System. https://blog.nemours.org/2017/02/sudden-cardiac-arrest-teenage-athletes-risk/

2“AHA Release 2015 Heart and Stroke Statistics”. Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation. http://www.sca-aware.org/sca-news/aha-releases-2015-heart-and-stroke-statistics

“Sports and Sudden Cardiac Arrest(SCA)”. Cardiosmart – American College of Cardiologyhttps://www.cardiosmart.org/Heart-Conditions/Sports-and-Sudden-Cardiac-Arrest

4Source: 2017, AHA Mediagenic Survey Results; 2017, AHA with Edelman Intelligence; 2017, AHA with BLR Media; Postgrad Medical Journal, October 2007.

5”Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) in Student-Athletes”. California Interscholastic Federation. http://www.cifstate.org/sports-medicine/sca/index

Stop the Bleed and AEDs at the University of Connecticut

We received the following testimonial from Justin Pedneault, the University of Connecticut Rescue President & Training Coordinator. Justin contacted School Health for assistance in getting the university to their goal of being a Heart Safe Campus. 

At the beginning of the 2017-2018 school year, I was working with the University of Connecticut School of Nursing on the Storrs campus to add a second AED to the nursing building. In addition to this, I wanted to add signs throughout the building directing people to the nearest AED, a first response kit and bleeding control kits to both AEDs, and then seek HeartSafe Workplace designation from the Connecticut Department of Public Health.  As part of this process, School of Nursing Dean Deborah Chyun asked me to give a 3-5-minute presentation at a campus-wide forum, with all academic department heads represented, in April 2018.  I gave a quick talk about the need for these improvements and how I was working with the School of Nursing to get them done. Following my presentation, the provost’s office, which put the event together, was flooded with emails asking how to do the same thing in all of the other academic departments and schools on the Storrs campus.

In response, the provost’s office created a committee that included the UConn Fire Department, Michael Zacchera from Hartford Hospital, Dr. Richard Kamin from UConn Health, the Facilities and Maintenance unit, the Office of Planning and Design, the Office of Emergency Management and myself. Our goal was to spend $150,000 towards accomplishing this task in academic buildings by the end of the fiscal year, giving us about 30 days to select equipment and place the first order.  We quickly met and ordered 100 Stryker (Physio Control) CR-Plus AEDs, alarmed cabinets, and 200 stop-the-bleed kits (2 kits with each AED cabinet) from School Health. This included signage and first response kits (mask, gloves, trauma shears, razor, etc.) with each AED. These were destined for all academic buildings on every UConn campus.

We were extremely fortunate that School Health worked with the manufacturer to donate all the cabinets, enabling us to purchase an additional 35 AEDs/cabinets/bleeding control supplies. We have since been given permission to plan for an additional 200 AEDs (with cabinets, first response kits and bleeding control kits) to cover every single building including residential and staff buildings on every single UConn campus (Storrs, Stamford, Hartford, Avery Point, Depot Campus). Our goal is to deliver an AED and bleeding control supplies to any victim in a round- trip walk of less than 3 minutes. This is a requirement to get the Connecticut Department of Public Health HeartSafe Campus designation, which we as a university are working to attain.  We have been working very closely with the DPH and they have been touring buildings with us while selecting the locations for these emergency supplies. Every inch of every building is being evaluated to determine the most beneficial and appropriate locations.

School Health has been a helpful and valuable partner in our effort to meet the needs of a large, complex enterprise like the University of Connecticut that has dozens of academic buildings spread across five campuses. Our goal is to make our campuses safe and responsive places for our students, faculty, staff, and visitors, and School Health has been key in helping us reach that goal.

Outside of my efforts with this committee, I also serve as the President and Training Coordinator for UConn Rescue, a student organization at the University of Connecticut which allows students to gain experience in the medical field with EMS training. This organization meets monthly with EMS continuing education classes and training scenarios for members. A key component of UConn Rescue is our training program. UConn Rescue regularly hosts American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Provider CPR/AED classes, AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED classes, AHA Heartsaver First Aid classes, and Stop the Bleed classes each semester. We began offering our first classes in April 2016 after I became an American Heart Association Basic Life Support CPR Instructor. I continue to be responsible for every aspect of coordinating, teaching, ordering, managing instructors for our ever-growing and expanding training classes each semester. UConn Rescue has offered over 1,500 seats for various trainings and trained almost 1,000 students, staff and faculty. These student-run programs meet the training requirement for the Connecticut DPH HeartSafe Campus designation.

While working on the HeartSafe Workplace efforts with the School of Nursing during the spring 2018 semester, I worked on integrating the Stop the Bleed class into the nursing simulation curriculum. The plan was to replace an existing assignment in the nursing students’ junior class schedule during a simulation in their fundamentals nursing class. As such, all undergraduate nursing students will be trained in the Stop the Bleed class before graduation in their junior year fall semester.

I have greatly enjoyed my efforts at the University of Connecticut and I look forward to seeing all my projects through and always seeking to improve existing processes.

New AED Legislation in California

Sudden cardiac arrest affects nearly 10,000 youth nationally per year according to the American Heart Association, while the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research reports that more student athletes die annually from sudden cardiac arrest than from sport-related trauma. As a result, more and more states are enacting AED legislation.

California Assembly Bill 2009 Requires AEDs at Interscholastic Athletic Programs by July 1, 2019

Joining several other states that have enacted some form of AED legislation pertaining to schools, California has established new requirements for public and charter schools that offer interscholastic athletic programs.

  • Mandates at least one automated external defibrillator (AED) be present on campus and accessible to authorized personnel during interscholastic athletic events or activities by July 1, 2019.

  • Requires a written emergency action plan that directs the use of the AED, and to have policies that protect school district employees from liability for providing emergency care.

  • Ensures AEDs are available to athletic trainers and coaches and other authorized individuals at athletic programs, on-campus activities, and events.

  • Ensures AEDs are registered and inspected and maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications, including, at a minimum, biannual testing and after each use.


Seconds Count with Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest causes more than 350,000 deaths every year, and while it is largely an issue for older adults, the syndrome is also among the leading causes of death among young athletes.

Rapid treatment of SCA with an AED can be lifesaving. An AED analyzes the heart rhythm and then sends an electric shock to the heart to try to restore its normal rhythm.

Every minute that defibrillation is delayed, the likelihood of survival from SCA drops about 10 percent. If bystanders act quickly and use an AED (in conjunction with CPR), the survival rate is 89 percent among student-athletes suffering SCA on a school campus.

According to the bill’s author, Assemblyman Brian Maienschein -San Diego, 42 young athletes in California died while engaged in physical activity between 2009 and 2011, and among those cases where a cause of death was released, 68 percent were attributed to sudden cardiac arrest.

“Although SCA can occur at any time, vigorous exercise appears to act as a trigger, making SCA more common during athletic practices and games,” Maienschein said in a statement. “SCA is the leading cause of death in athletes during exercise and usually results from intrinsic cardiac conditions that are triggered by vigorous exercise.”

“If automated external defibrillators are more readily available for authorized personnel to use, the lives of more student athletes and spectators will be saved,” he said.

He adds that while almost every coach in California has been trained to use the AED, only about 75 percent of high schools have the machines. The chances of survival are close to 90 percent if a deliberator is used within the first minute of collapse. After that, chances of surviving rapidly decline.

American Heart Association Recommended Protocol

The American Heart Association already has a recommended protocol for schools to create a cardiac emergency response plan:

  • Identification of one or more cardiac emergency response teams trained to respond quickly in case of medical emergencies;

  • Strategic placement and routine maintenance of AEDs, ideally to ensure that an AED is readily accessible so that a rescuer can retrieve it and deliver a shock within three minutes of collapse;

  • Dissemination of the plan throughout the school campus;

  • Ongoing staff training in CPR and AED use;

  • Regular drills throughout the school year to ensure school staff are prepared to respond to medical emergencies;

  • Working with local emergency responders to ensure the plan is integrated into community emergency response protocols; and

  • Annual review and evaluation of the plan.


Full text of the Bill can be found here.

School Health can help you decide what supplies you need to prepare your school for emergency situations. Visit our California AED Legislation Page for more information.

Increasing The Odds For Survival with Real CPR Help

Zoll AEDCPR Saves Lives.That’s why more than 30 states now require students to receive CPR training before they graduate from high school. Many of these states also require that students be trained to use an automated external defibrillator (AED).

CPR + AED = even more lives saved.

The evidence is indisputable: high-quality CPR is the primary component in influencing survival from cardiac arrest.1 Not every patient will need a defibrillating shock, but every patient will need CPR to increase the flow of oxygenated blood to the heart and brain.

Even for seasoned health care professionals, it’s hard to know if you are pushing hard enough and fast enough to meet current AHA Guidelines for compression rate and depth. With ZOLL’s proprietary Real CPR Help technology, you know. It provides audio and visual feedback that guides rescuers to deliver high-quality CPR. ZOLL introduced Real CPR Help® in 2002, and it is standard on every AED and professional defibrillator ZOLL sells.

Superior Support in a Rescue, 100% of the Time!

The ZOLL AED Plus®defibrillator with Real CPR Help provides integrated, real-time CPR feedback to help rescuers save a life. Only half of all sudden cardiac arrest victims will need a shock, while 100% will need high-quality CPR. Real CPR Help guides you every step of the way, telling you—and showing you—whether you need to “Push Harder” or whether you’re providing “Good Compressions.”

Not all heart rhythms are “shockable,” but high-quality CPR can potentially convert a non-shockable rhythm into one that is shockable. Even if this isn’t possible, CPR will keep blood circulating until emergency services arrives.

If a shock is required, CPR must begin immediately after the shock is delivered. The heart struggles as it tries to restore to a normal rhythm. Without CPR, a shock alone may be ineffective. Whether the victim requires a shock—or not—the AED Plus will support you 100% of the time.

Focused on CPR Quality

High-quality CPR improves survival from cardiac arrest, and rescuers need to “maximize the quality of CPR” to save more lives.1,2

High quality means providing compressions at the proper depth and rate, making sure not to lean on the chest, and keeping interruptions to an absolute minimum. In its 2015 Guidelines, the American Heart Associationidentifies five critical components required to provide high-quality CPR:

  • Compression rate of 100–120 per minute

  • Compression depth of 2–2.4 inches (5–6 centimeters)

  • Avoid leaning on the chest to allow for full recoil after each compression

  • Minimize pauses in compressions (chest compression fraction > 60%)

  • Avoid excessive ventilation (2 breaths/30 compressions without advanced airway; 10 breaths/minute with advanced airway)


Rescuers at every experience level need assistance when delivering CPR. The Real CPR Help technology on ZOLL’s AEDs and professional defibrillators assists lay rescuers and health care professionals alike in delivering high-quality CPR to meet the guideline recommended rate and depth.

How Real CPR Help Works

Using accelerometer technology, a sensor inside ZOLL’s CPR electrodes captures the rate and depth of each compression. Once the electrodes are placed on the patient, the person providing CPR presses on the clearly marked hand placement indicator that covers the sensor. The information captured is sent to the defibrillator, where it is immediately processed and provided in real time to the rescuer.

This real-time feedback is a critical component in reaching high-quality CPR. With audio and visual prompts to push harder, rescuers can immediately adjust their CPR as needed to reach the most effective rate and depth of compressions.

Chances of Survival More than Doubled

Studies in Arizona and California prove that high-quality CPR saves lives and that Real CPR Help can improve CPR quality.3,4 A large study of EMS providers in Arizona showed that the odds of survival increased 2.7 times with ZOLL’s industry-exclusive Real CPR Help and scenario-based training.3 And survival to discharge and good neurological outcomes doubled after the implementation of a “resuscitation bundle” at the University of California San Diego Medical Center that included Real CPR Help and specialized training.4

In a sudden cardiac arrest emergency, the victim’s best chance for survival is immediate CPR and a rescuer with an AED. Many people may not realize how critical effective CPR is in determining a victim’s outcome. ZOLL’s Real CPR Help guides rescuers at every experience level with real-time feedback to give them the confidence that they are providing potentially life-saving, high-quality CPR.

1Meaney PA, et al. Circulation. 2013 Jul 23;128(4):417–35.
2Neumar RW, et al. Circulation. 2015;132(suppl 2):S315–S367.
3Bobrow B, et al. Annals of Emergency Medicine. July 2013:62(1):47-56.31.
4Davis DP, et al. Resuscitation. 2015 Jul;92:63-9

What You Need to Know About Cardiac Emergency Response

Badge_SH_CardiacEmergencyResponseIn 2015, the American Heart Association (AHA) reported over 326,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest events. When cardiac arrest events occur outside of the hospital, the average survival rate is just 10.3 percent.But did you know that survival rates are three times higher if the event is witnessed by a bystander? And when a victim receives assistance, even by a lay bystander, the chances of survival can double, and in some cases triple! [1]

Take Action and Saves Lives

The first minutes of a cardiac emergency are the most critical, and even the best emergency medical services (EMS) personnel can’t reach victims right away. A study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal showed that people who suffer cardiac arrest on the upper floors of high-rise buildings are less likely to survive than those on the lowest floors. The higher floors are associated with longer response times for EMS personnel to reach victims, and they directly correlate to lower survival rates.[2]

But with a Cardiac Emergency Response Plan (CERP), we can help bridge the gap between a cardiac emergency and the arrival of EMS personnel. A CERP is a written document that outlines specific steps to take when a cardiac emergency occurs. According to the AHA, “A carefully orchestrated response to cardiac emergencies will reduce deaths in school settings and help ensure that chaos does not lead to an improper or inadequate response.” [3]

Is Your Cardiac Emergency Response Plan Complete?

Essential parts of a CERP include making sure that you have adequate staff on hand who are trained in CPR. When CPR is performed, even by a lay bystander, a victim’s chance of survival is greatly improved. Products like the AHA’s CPR in Schools Training Kit is an essential tool for training staff and students the proper way to perform CPR.

A CERP will also include making sure your school has enough AEDs, and that your AEDs are properly located. Remember that timing immediately after a cardiac emergency is critical. The number of AEDs at your school should be sufficient to enable your response team to retrieve an AED and respond to a victim within two minutes, both inside the school and on the school grounds. AEDs should have clear signage and should always be in locations that are always accessible. School Health offers a full line of AEDs and accessories to make sure that your school has the equipment you need.

Proper maintenance of AEDs is also critical. Imagine the nightmare scenario of investing in an AED program but not maintaining it. Suddenly a cardiac emergency occurs and your AED is retrieved only to find that the pads or batteries have expired. We hear from people who try to maintain their AED program using an Excel spreadsheet, but that is simply not enough – especially when your campus contains many AEDs or AEDs distributed across campus locations.

School Health Brand AED Program Management helps you manage all the AEDs at your location and even across your campus.  What’s more, this system tracks all your responder certifications so you know that each person on your cardiac emergency response team has proper and continuous training. And, it keeps you compliant with local and state regulations by automatically registering your AEDs with local EMS services. You will even receive direct updates about changes to the regulations in your area.

When you have a complete CERP and include these essential elements, you can save lives when a cardiac emergency occurs. School Health works directly with the AHA to make sure that we can provide the products and information you need to be prepared. If you would like a consultation or on-site visit to discuss your CERP or lifesaving products for your school, please contact us.

[1] http://www.sca-aware.org/sca-news/aha-releases-2015-heart-and-stroke-statistics

[2] http://www.cmaj.ca/content/188/6/413

[3] http://cpr.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@ecc/documents/downloadable/ucm_477110.pdf

Let’s Talk About Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Schools

october-cardiac-200x300Each year, approximately 7,000 children age 18 or younger experience sudden cardiac arrest outside a hospital with survival rates of less than 10 percent. Immediate CPR can double or triple someone’s chance of survival, which is important for schools since children spend at least one-third of their days in this environment.

Yet only 34 states require CPR training and hands-on practice as a high school graduation requirement and just four mandate school planning for sudden cardiac arrest. That leaves 15 states and the District of Columbia without laws related to CPR, AEDs or cardiac emergency response plans (CERPs) in schools.

Last month, School Nurse published a policy statement from the American Heart Association advocating for state laws requiring the implementation of CERPs in K-12 schools. Cardiac Emergency Response Planning for Schools: A Policy Statement provides a national model for K-12 schools to develop, implement, practice and evaluate a CERP, while addressing the legal aspects and critical nature of training and drills in bringing a CERP to fruition.

The statement recommends that all schools have a CERP in place that contains the following minimum, evidence-based core elements:

  • Establishing a cardiac emergency response team

  • Activating the team in response to a sudden cardiac arrest

  • Implementing automated external defibrillator (AED) placement and routine maintenance within the school (similar to fire extinguisher protocols)

  • Disseminating the plan throughout the school campus

  • Maintaining ongoing staff training in CPR/AED use

  • Practicing using drills (akin to fire and lockdown drills)

  • Integrating local EMS with the plan

  • Ongoing and annual review and evaluation of the plan.


Monica Martin Goble, MD, AHA volunteer and pediatric cardiologist at the University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, was co-chair of the working group that authored the paper. She says, “Every minute counts in sudden cardiac arrest. The safety of students, school staff and visitors will only be enhanced by school teams that feel empowered to administer lifesaving care until EMS arrives.” 

A key component to high-quality CPR training is a psychomotor component, or hands-on training. Programs like the AHA’s CPR in Schools Training Kit™ enable students to learn the lifesaving skills of CPR in just one class period. Plus, the kit teaches AED use and choking relief. For school administrators interested in developing a plan, a CERP toolkit, including the policy statement and an accompanying “Policy-in-Brief” can be accessed at heart.org/cerp.

This October, we invite you to join the AHA and School Health as we work together to increase survival from sudden cardiac arrest, especially in school settings. #CPRSavesLives

CPR Week: Learn Two Simple Steps to Save a Life

DS-11042 SH CPRWeek Banner-1024x427_jpg (2)

CPR and AED Awareness Week is Every June 1-7


Statistically speaking, did you know that if you are called on to give CPR in an emergency, you will most likely be trying to save the life of someone you love? This could be a parent, child, friend, or a student.

June 1-7 is National CPR and AED Awareness Week. In 2007, the American Heart Association worked collaboratively with the American Red Cross and the National Safety Council to federally designate a National CPR and AED Awareness Week. On December 13, 2007, Congress unanimously passed a resolution to set aside this week each year to spotlight how lives can be saved if more Americans know CPR and how to use an AED. In the declaration, Congress asked states and municipalities to make AEDs more publicly accessible. Schools around the country emphasize the importance of CPR and AED use during this week each year with CPR/AED classes and live events/demonstrations that are conducted.

The AHA invites you to celebrate National CPR and AED Awareness Week in your school. To help get you started, we have created FREE materials that you can print on your school’s printer. Simply visit heart.org/cprweek to access these materials which can be used by themselves or in conjunction with an existing CPR course, like the CPR in Schools Training Kit.

Join the AHA and its Mission to Increase Survival from Cardiac Arrest


We are asking all educators to please take a few minutes out of your day to learn a potentially lifesaving skill. In just 90 seconds, you can learn the two simple steps to Hands-Only CPR by watching this video and sharing the link with your students and co-workers.

Thank you for learning how to save a life!

Free CPR Training Resource Helps Students and Community to Save Lives


Is Your Campus Prepared for a Cardiac Emergency?


Each year, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. Cardiac arrest is an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs.

Survival stats are grim. Over 70 percent of cardiac arrests happen outside of the hospital, which means this can happen anywhere - at home, at work, or even in an educational setting. About 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. And while CPR, especially if performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival, only about 46% of people who experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest get the immediate help that they need before professional help arrives.

Students play in integral part in increasing survival from cardiac arrest. Currently, 31 states require CPR training, including hands on practice on a manikin, as a high school graduation requirement. As of result of this legislation, approximately 1.8 million students (nearly 60 percent of the U.S. student population) are trained each year in the lifesaving skill of CPR.

Being prepared and confident to respond requires keeping skills as fresh as possible. That’s why the American Heart Association recommends receiving CPR training every two years and why it is currently exploring ways to bridge the gap between mandatory high school training and university-level courses.

Since the needs of university level students differ greatly from the needs of middle or high school students, the American Heart Association has introduced the brand new CPR in Schools University Toolkit. The toolkit consists of free resources for event activation, promotion, and social media resources for student athletes, members of a Greek organizations, resident assistants, student government officers, club members, among others. These resources provide everything needed to plan, organize and execute a CPR training event for students on campus.

Bring CPR Training to Your Campus with AHA's CPR in Schools Training Kit


55583fl_w_3_1The AHA’s CPR in Schools Training Kit is an all-in-one educational program that provides an opportunity for college students to bring Hands-Only CPR training to their campuses. Hands-Only CPR is CPR without mouth-to-mouth breaths. It is the recommended approach for anyone who has not been trained by a credentialed instructor who sees a teen or adult suddenly collapse in an out-of-hospital setting.

This kit allows college students to facilitate Hands-Only CPR trainings with their fellow students and spread the message of Hands-Only CPR. In this leadership role, students teach other students how to save lives.

The training kit comes complete with support from the American Heart Association, the trusted leader in heart health. These kits are easy to use, durable, and are designed to train 10 -20 people at once. The kit is also reusable, so one kit can train hundreds of people. Plus, you do not need to be an AHA instructor which is why thousands of high schools and middle schools throughout the country are currently using these kits. The kit can also be used to train campus faculty, staff and community members to extend the lifesaving skills into the community.

Students learn so much in college, but it’s also important to continue the skills they learned in high school. Please share this with friends and family to make students aware that they can become a part of the generation of lifesavers and help save a life with CPR.

Develop a Lifesaving Cardiac Emergency Response Plan for Your School

 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) affects roughly 326,000 people each year, including over 6,000 youth. During cardiac events, time becomes a critical factor. With each passing minute, an SCA victim’s chance for survival decreases by 7 to 10 percent.

Recently, a study that appeared in the AED Rescue ImageCanadian Medical Association Journal showed that people who suffer cardiac arrest on the upper floors of high-rise buildings are less likely to survive than those on the lowest floors. The study found that less than 1 percent of people above the 16th floor survived a cardiac arrest, while over 4 percent of people on the first or second floor survived. The higher floors are associated with longer response times for EMS personnel to reach victims, and they directly correlate to lower survival rates.

But these first minutes are critical whether a victim of SCA is in a tall building or a small community school. That’s why it’s important for both rural and urban communities to develop a planned response to a cardiac emergency, before the emergency occurs. Having a planned response that is known and rehearsed can help save precious minutes between an SCA event and when a victim begins to receive care.

To help prepare your school for a cardiac emergency, the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation recommends having a Cardiac Emergency Response Plan in place. A Cardiac Emergency Response Plan is a written plan that establishes what steps to take if an SCA event happens in your school.

According to the SCA Foundation, the Cardiac Emergency Response Plan will help make sure that you can respond efficiently and effectively when a cardiac emergency occurs. Quick action in the first few minutes of a cardiac emergency, even by lay bystanders, can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival.

With a Cardiac Emergency Response Plan, you can:

  • Identify a Cardiac Emergency Response Team – The Cardiac Emergency Response Team should include staff members with CPR/AED training, the school nurse, school administrators, health and physical education teachers, athletic directors, athletic trainers, coaches, and event advisors. Each member of the team should be familiar with the plan, and provide evaluations and updates as necessary.

  • Properly Place AEDs – The number of AEDs placed at a school should be sufficient to enable the response team to retrieve an AED and respond to a victim within two minutes of notification, both inside the school and on the school grounds. AEDs should have clear signage and should always be in locations that are accessible at all times. School Health offers a full line of AEDs and accessories to make sure that your school has the equipment you need.

  • Ensure AED Readiness & Maintenance – AEDs should be regularly checked and maintained according to manufacturer’s recommendations. Schools should designate a specific contact to verify AED readiness and maintenance. In addition, resuscitation kits - including latex free gloves, a razor, a pair of scissors, antiseptic wipes, and a CPR barrier mask – should accompany all AED devices

  • Establish Emergency Response Protocol – The Cardiac Emergency Response Team should establish a protocol to follow in case of a cardiac event. The protocol should include properly recognizing the signs of cardiac arrest, calling 911 and assigning someone to meet the emergency responders, starting CPR, and using an AED.

  • Train Staff for Cardiac Events - The sooner an SCA victim receives care, including bystander CPR, the more likely they are to survive. An effective Cardiac Emergency Response Plan calls for at least 10 percent of school staff – including the school nurse – to be trained in CPR and AED use. This training should include both cognitive and hands-on practice, with continuous training that helps to ensure readiness in the event of a cardiac emergency. Products like the AHA’s CPR in School Training Kit can help ensure that your staff has the training that they need.

  • Notify Parents – The Cardiac Emergency Response Team should notify parents that the school has adopted a Cardiac Emergency Response Plan, and encourage parents to be trained in CPR/AED use.


These carefully orchestrated responses to cardiac emergencies will help reduce deaths in school settings and can help ensure that chaos does not lead to an improper or inadequate response.


For more information about Cardiac Emergency Response Plans and insightful SCA information, please visit the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

What You Need to Know About the Latest AHA Guidelines

New information from the American Heart Association about providing lifesaving care during a cardiac emergency.


 

Resuscitating unconscious boyOn October 15th 2015, the American Heart Association (AHA) released the newly revised guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and emergency cardiovascular care. The AHA continues to emphasize the importance of HIGH QUALITY CPR in an emergency cardiac situation. Effective CPR provided immediately after a cardiac event can double or even triple a victim’s chances for survival.


Studies have shown that people who feel comfortable performing CPR are significantly more likely to attempt life-saving resuscitation. Routine practice is needed in order to get the rhythm down for to perform the proper depth and rate of CPR.



Here are the AHA’s newest guidelines for providing high quality CPR:

 




Single rescuer:





  • The recommended sequence for a single rescuer has been confirmed: the single rescuer is to initiate chest compressions before giving rescue breaths to reduce delay to first compression. The single rescuer should begin CPR with 30 chest compressions followed by 2 breaths.





Single or multiple rescuer:




  • There is continued emphasis on the characteristics of high-quality CPR: compressing the chest at an adequate rate and depth, allowing complete chest recoil after each compression, minimizing interruptions in compressions, and avoiding excessive ventilation.

  • The recommended chest compression rate is 100 to 120 compressions per minute (updated from at least 100/min).

  • The clarified recommendation for chest compression depth for adults is at least 2 inches but not greater than 2.4 inches.





How do you know if you are performing high quality CPR during a rescue? With CPR, practice makes perfect. From manikins to AEDs to CPR masks, School Health offers the products that you need in order to practice proper CPR. We can help you make sure that everyone is properly trained to respond in an emergency cardiac situation.



Watch a video to see how Pasadena ISD is training the next generation of lifesavers!





 




 




Consider the following products for quality CPR and CPR practice:





 






























CiSTrainingKitAHAFullProduct_LS_med The American Heart Association CPR in Schools Training Kit gives you the tools you need to teach the core skills of CPR and AED use in under 30 minutes.
59105_w The CPR RsQ Assist helps the lay responder perform high quality CPR by combining voice commands with a metronome that indicates proper compression frequency.
loopscreengrabgamify-2 When training students or community groups to perform life-saving CPR, School Health recommends the LOOP CPR Training Game. The LOOP uses game-related concepts to create a compelling training experience by showing what’s right and what needs to improve.
prestan_three-adult_v21_1 The Prestan Adult Manikin with CPR Monitor is a way to practice on a life-size manikin, offering a realistic experience to provide better CPR outcomes in emergency situations.
55410 The Prestan CPR/AED Training Kit is available exclusively through School Heath and is the complete CPR/AED training solution. By combining Prestan Manikins, the Prestan AED Trainer, and the LOOP CPR training game, training groups can practice the skills they need to achieve proper rhythm and depth, as well as best practices for proper AED use.
g5_expirationupdate Todays advanced AEDs also provide real-time feedback that offer helpful instructions to guide responders in emergency situations. School Health recommends the Cardiac Science Powerheart G5, the ZOLL AED Plus, and the Heartsine 650P. These advanced AEDs combine ease of use and reliability to help everyone when responding in an emergency situation.




For incredible save stories and insightful SCA information please visit the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.